alis volat propriis

ancientwinters:

fetalcasserole:

luniara:

necroneko13:

yamino:

lettucekitty:

xekstrin:

caracolbajoelsol:

ladyyatexel:

Yūga being extra smooth while performing Moonlight Legend at Japan Expo (x)

Tuxedo Mask becomes so much more compelling to me when played by a woman, sign me up, I am HERE for this.

That wink

breathes heavily

that wink

Lady Tuxedo Mask is the best Tuxedo Mask.

HOLY CRAP I THINK I JUST BECAME A LESBIAN FOR HER……….

I… I have a weird feeling down there.

ya’ll should check out takarazua then

O H

elkaydee:

thepluralisphoenixii:

imkatandimawesome:

sansaspark:

During the scene when Mulan decides to go to war instead of her father, she decides to do it while sitting on the foot of the Great Stone Dragon. The image of the dragon looking over Mulan is repeatpred several times throughout the sequence, and the bolts of lightning strike at significant times whenever the dragon is in sight. When Mulan takes her father’s scroll and when she is praying to her ancestors, the Great Stone Dragon can be seen. It is also engraved on the sword Mulan uses to cut her hair and the handles of the wardrobe containing the armor are in the shape of the dragon’s head. The dragon’s eyes glowing in the temple symbolizes Mulan’s role as protector of her family awakening, instead of the actual dragon.

The reason Mushu couldn’t wake the dragon is because the dragon was no longer there. Mulan is implied to be the Great Dragon that protects her family.

CHRIST HOW DID I MISS THAT AFTER ALL THESE YEARS

WHAT

HOOO SHITZ

spookygoo:

I was talking about why Chef Gordon Ramsay was so angry all the time, and explained that he originally wanted to be a professional soccer player but suffered a really bad knee injury and couldn’t play anymore, so he poured himself into cooking and culinary arts to help with his anger issues, but his abusive alcoholic father disapproved of his cooking and died before ever tasting any of it and I realized that Gordon Ramsay has the most anime backstory ever.

imagine-jim-bones-and-spock:

imagine everyone on the enterprise treating uhura like everyone on tumblr treats natalie dormer

imagine jim telling spock that “uhura could literally kick me in the shins, spit on my face, and take the captains chair away from me and i’d probably be like ‘okay thank you do you want a footrub your eyes are so pretty’”

thisismyideaofhumor:

I had a dream the other night that they made a Night Vale movie and that Cecil was introduced with a very dramatic shot of him walking down the station hallway until it pans down and you see he’s wearing light-up sketchers

Hugo Weaving - I'm Your Man (by Leonard Cohen)
22,481 plays

Yeah you know that crazy talented Aussie who plays iconic badasses in movies like The Matrix trilogy, V For Vendetta, Lord of The Rings series, and most recently, The Hobbit?

Well, now I present to you…
Hugo Weaving.
Singing.
Leonard Cohen’s “I’m Your Man”.
Jazz style.

#now I understand if you think it’s entirely inappropriate to tag this with those movies #but you don’t understand
#HUGO WEAVING
#AKA AGENT SMITH
#AKA MEGATRON
#AKA V
#AKA LORD ELROND 
#CROONING
#JAZZ STYLE 

340,299 plays

the-big-phan-theory:

hemmingsstagram:

hailrian:

feelsofacatlady:

ohsoswiftly:

Patrick Stump of Fall out Boy attempts to sing “I Knew You Were Trouble” in Killer Karaoke.

WHEN HE GETS TO THE CHORUS IT IS PERFECT HE IS PERFECT I WANT A RECORDED VERSION

so let’s talk about his laugh

he’s so cute oh my god

can we just

leseanthomas:

The Lone Ranger wasn’t just a legend perpetuated by books, radio shows, television series and movies; he was a real man, a crimefighter who lived with Native Americans in what would become Oklahoma—and he was black. “The real ‘Lone Ranger,’ it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon,” Political Blind Spot reported. “Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.” Born a slave, Bass Reeves escaped during the Civil War, fleeing to what was then Indian Territory to live “harmoniously” among the Seminole and Creek Indians. “After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshal in Arkansas and the Indian Territory,” Political Blind Spot reported. “If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.” Like the legendary Lone Ranger, Reeves handed out pieces of silver—coins, though, not bullets—that would become his trademark. He was a master of disguise, an expert marksman, and he even, for a time, rode a silver horse. “Like the famed Lone Ranger legend, Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto,” Political Blind Spot reported. “Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.” More from the site: The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit. The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier. A couple of books have been written about Reeves’ life: Vaunda Michaux Nelson won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author for her book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal. Arthur Burton published Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves. This Land has covered Reeves, too, in an excerpt from Michael Wallis’ book Wild West 365.  Wallis wrote: Bass Reeves was born a slave and died a hero. … Reeves became fluent in Creek and several other Indian languages and was a master of disguise, a talent he often employed when pursuing criminals.  He also was ambidextrous and could shoot a pistol with great accuracy using either hand.  At a time when unconcealed racism was widespread, the physically imposing Reeves won the respect of his fellow deputies and even some of the outlaws he tracked down and brought to justice. - See more at: http://thislandpress.com/roundups/bass-reeves-the-real-lone-ranger/#sthash.zmBikGYd.dpuf

leseanthomas:

The Lone Ranger wasn’t just a legend perpetuated by books, radio shows, television series and movies; he was a real man, a crimefighter who lived with Native Americans in what would become Oklahoma—and he was black.

“The real ‘Lone Ranger,’ it turns out, was an African American man named Bass Reeves, who the legend was based upon,” Political Blind Spot reported. “Perhaps not surprisingly, many aspects of his life were written out of the story, including his ethnicity. The basics remained the same: a lawman hunting bad guys, accompanied by a Native American, riding on a white horse, and with a silver trademark.” Born a slave, Bass Reeves escaped during the Civil War, fleeing to what was then Indian Territory to live “harmoniously” among the Seminole and Creek Indians. “After the Civil War finally concluded, he married and eventually fathered ten children, making his living as a Deputy U.S. Marshal in Arkansas and the Indian Territory,” Political Blind Spot reported.

“If this surprises you, it should, as Reeves was the first African American to ever hold such a position.” Like the legendary Lone Ranger, Reeves handed out pieces of silver—coins, though, not bullets—that would become his trademark. He was a master of disguise, an expert marksman, and he even, for a time, rode a silver horse. “Like the famed Lone Ranger legend, Reeves had his own close friend like Tonto,” Political Blind Spot reported. “Reeves’ companion was a Native American posse man and tracker who he often rode with, when he was out capturing bad guys. In all, there were close to 3000 of such criminals they apprehended, making them a legendary duo in many regions.” More from the site: The final proof that this legend of Bass Reeves directly inspired into the story of the Lone Ranger can be found in the fact that a large number of those criminals were sent to federal prison in Detroit.

The Lone Ranger radio show originated and was broadcast to the public in 1933 on WXYZ in Detroit where the legend of Reeves was famous only two years earlier. A couple of books have been written about Reeves’ life: Vaunda Michaux Nelson won the 2010 Coretta Scott King Award for best author for her book, Bad News for Outlaws: The Remarkable Life of Bass Reeves, Deputy U.S. Marshal. Arthur Burton published Black Gun, Silver Star: The Life and Legend of Frontier Marshal Bass Reeves. This Land has covered Reeves, too, in an excerpt from Michael Wallis’ book Wild West 365.  

Wallis wrote: Bass Reeves was born a slave and died a hero. … Reeves became fluent in Creek and several other Indian languages and was a master of disguise, a talent he often employed when pursuing criminals.  He also was ambidextrous and could shoot a pistol with great accuracy using either hand.  At a time when unconcealed racism was widespread, the physically imposing Reeves won the respect of his fellow deputies and even some of the outlaws he tracked down and brought to justice. -

See more at: http://thislandpress.com/roundups/bass-reeves-the-real-lone-ranger/#sthash.zmBikGYd.dpuf

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

rouxx:

i cant get over this gif of sam super-kicking the winter soldier in the head

image

HE JUST FUCKING GLIDED DOWN AND KICKED HIM IN THE HEAD.

FLYING BOOT TO THE HEAD

Go ahead and ask. You know you want to.